Resources

For Parents


Why your teen won’t talk to you

Dear Shaunti, In the last few months, it has gotten so hard for my teenage daughter to talk to me. I learn everything from listening to her tell her friends. Yesterday I overheard her telling a friend about being a finalist in a writing contest at school. When I asked her about it, she said she didn’t want to tell…read more →

Has My Teen Lost His Faith?

Dear Shaunti, My 15-year old son begins his complaining about going to church on Saturday night and doesn’t quit even after we’ve forced him to go on Sunday morning. He’s always loved church and he has plenty of friends. I asked him to pray about it and he told me matter-of-factly that he doesn’t even know if he believes God…read more →

Identity

One of the most mystifying things that a husband and wife can go through begins when their child enters middle school. Couples start hearing things like, “Uh, Mom, not to hurt your feelings or anything, but don’t go clothes shopping for me anymore, okay? Just drop me at the mall with some money.” Wow, that can be painful to hear!…read more →

Tales from the Dark Side

I need to make a confession. It’s not something in which I’m proud but I think you will likely be able to relate. I wish I could say that I always respond to my husband and children in the right way and am filled with patience even when I feel as if I’m drowning in a sea of responsibilities. Unfortunately,…read more →

A Dad’s Talk With His Daughter After Reading For Parents Only

Dads, you are all so very important and your kids are actually influenced by what you say and do with them far more than you may believe. I want to share with you an email we received from a single dad who, inspired by my book For Parents Only, initiated an important conversation with his 13 year old daughter about…read more →

Talking to Your Teen

Talking to a teenager is like… It’s amazing what comes up when you do a Google search with those words! Talking to a teenager is like talking to aliens. Talking to teenagers is like trying to nail Jell-O to a tree. Talking to a teenager is like pulling weeds. None of these things sounds particularly inviting. Yet, as parents we…read more →

A Mother’s Day Encouragement – You’ll See Great Things In Time

I’m not a big gardener, but I grew up watching a vital truth unfold as my mother poured effort into her garden day after day, seeing no visible results at first, but knowing the results would come.  I would get impatient staring at bare soil after hours spent tilling and planting and weeding, but she’d say, “Just wait.  Keep going. …read more →

Parents: A Word abount Instagram

This is an amazing article on Instagram that every parent of a middle schooler (or even high schooler) has to read.  When Lysa TerKeurst and I wrote Made to Crave for Young Women, I began thinking a lot about what social media does to how kids think about themselves.  This article nails it, and opens our eyes to just how…read more →

Real Life Road Rash

With Shaunti on the road and the approach of a writing deadline, Vanessa Snyder, MA, LPC, LMFT, shares from her own experience as the mother of teens. You would think I would finally have it together.  I have been a mother longer than not.  I have papers on my wall that tell me I am a professional; a specialist even…read more →

Can You Hear Me Now?

“Honey, how was school today?” “I told you – fine.” A friend of mine relayed this conversation, sad and frustrated.  After listening to her teenage son grunt out a series of monosyllabic answers to her questions, this mom looked at him and just sighed in exasperation.  She then backed up and tried again, this time imploring him to share. “Honestly,…read more →

Don’t Freak Out!

Don’t Freak Out!  That advice seems so simple in theory, but if you have children – especially teens and tweens — it is pretty natural to react in a way that they interpret as ‘freaking out’, which shuts down lines of communication without you ever realizing it. I must have gotten 20 plus texts the other weekend, it was hilarious. …read more →