Research: National Survey: How Men Think in the Workplace (for the books For Women Only in the Workplace and The Male Factor)

Survey of How Men Think In the Workplace

Survey Data as of: 9/9/2008

Methodology

For a greater understanding of the rigor and therefore the integrity behind this survey, we have provided this easy to read explanation of our Survey Methodology.

If you are a print publication or media representative, and would like to arrange to receive more detail on the methodology of the survey, the demographics of the responders, or cross-tabulation data, please contact us.

Endnotes

Question 1

The tallied answer represents an estimate of men who actually did or didn’t expect different behavior in the workplace, based on their answer(s) to several later questions about more “real life” scenarios. (Experience has found that both men and women at times have difficulty understanding their real answer to a purely conceptual question such as Q1, and that providing examples and real life scenarios often helps get at the issue a different way.) The tallied answer is comprised of those who gave one or more of the following answers on the survey: (1) on Q1 (the original question noted here); (1) on Q2; (1) or (2) on Q4; (1) Q18.1, Q18.2, or Q18.5; (2) on Q18.7; (1) on Q23 or Q23.

This tallied answer isn’t a perfect comparison, since the questions were not able to compare a man’s response to a “personal” situation at work to that of a similar situation in his personal life. However, those answer choices would commonly be the opposite of those considered appropriate in a personal setting (such as not considering another person’s feelings when making a decision that affected them). Thus, while the comparison isn’t perfect, the tallied answer is likely to be a somewhat more realistic representation of how a man actually feels about whether the work and personal worlds function differently.